Sean Feucht leads worship at Supreme Court, announces new ministry house on Capitol Hill

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Traveling worship leader and former congressional candidate Sean Feucht led a vibrant worship service outside the U.S. Supreme Court as part of his Hold the Line ministry.

Speakers ranging from ministerial workers to activists to members of Congress participated in the service with a holistic message of bringing America back to God. The timing of the event put the Church on grand display before the High Court as America awaits the impending overturn of Roe v. Wade.

As the service was drawing to a close, Feucht announced that his ministry had purchased a house on Capitol Hill that will serve as a ministry hub for people living in or visiting Washington D.C. The house has been named “Camp Elah” after the Israelite’s camp in the Valley of Elah where David slew Goliath.

Following the worship service, a group gathered at Camp Elah for an informal commissioning of the house’s ministry on Capitol Hill. John Wesley Reid spoke with Feucht after the event to hear more about the purpose behind the new house. He explained,

“We’ll be partnering with churches across America in coordinated strategic initiatives. But it’s gonna be a house of prayer and worship. It’s going to be a place where people can encounter the love of God and it’s gonna be a place where we commission people to prayer walk for the next 30 days. We’re gonna have people meeting at the house at noon and doing prayer walks around the Supreme Court.”

Feucht added that he wants the house to be a center where members of Congress can be discipled and, ultimately, that it be used for God’s glory since “it’s God’s house.”

“My hope for this house is that it will be a resting place of His presence, where worship and prayer will be going on in such a strategic location just blocks away from the Supreme Court and the Capitol. I think a big part of it is taking back territory, designating this as a resting place for God amidst all the legislation and the things that change the world on these streets, that God will be enthroned here. I want discipleship for members of Congress, Bible studies, worship services…it’s God’s house.”

During the meeting, prayer and worship were prominent, including a time specifically of praying for Capitol Hill staffers who were present.

Since the bombshell draft leak of Justice Samuel Alito’s opinion of the Court, several protests have erupted across the Washington D.C. metropolitan area. Yet within many of them, the Church has made a footprint. On the evening of Monday, May 9, for example, nearly 200 protestors took to the streets of Justice Alito’s residence with vulgar chants and signs, but through the chants and slurs, the hymn “Tis So Sweet to Trust in Jesus” could be heard from the street being played by a neighbor on her grand piano with the window intentionally open.

Last Monday, May 16, pro-life activists gathered outside the Supreme Court in anticipation that the scheduled opinion issuance day would present a formal decision on Dobbs v. Jackson’s Women Health and thus bring an absolute answer as to the fate of Roe v. Wade. In addition to a speaker lineup, the crown joined in to sing “Amazing Grace.”