Vermont to provide free condoms to all middle and high school students without parental consent or knowledge

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Vermont has become the first state in the nation to mandate that all schools provide condoms to students in the 7th grade and above.

Quick Facts

That means that children as young as 12 can receive condoms at school, not only without parental consent, but also without any requirement to talk to a school employee. The law states,

“In order to prevent or reduce unintended pregnancies and sexually transmitted diseases, each school district shall make condoms available to all students in its secondary schools, free of charge. School district administrative teams, in consultation with school district nursing staff, shall determine the best manner in which to make condoms available to students. At a minimum, condoms shall be placed in locations that are safe and readily accessible to students, including the school nurse’s office.”

Condoms are distributed to the schools by Planned Parenthood of Northern New England.

The Vermont Agency of Education (VAE) said, “No secondary student will be refused access to condoms through this program. Minors in Vermont have a legal right to access a full range of reproductive and sexual health services without parent permission. Minors are provided access to condoms in variety of settings and may purchase them without parental consent.”

The agency claims, “Research shows that condom availability programs increase condom use in sexually active youth, promote delayed sexual initiation or abstinence, provide medical care costs savings, and reduce the risk of HIV, STD, and unplanned pregnancy.”

The bill was proposed by Republican Rep. Topper McFaun, who said he was trying to reduce the number of abortions.

The VAE claims that “there is no evidence that teaching about condom use contributes to increased sexual activity among adolescents.”

The sexualization of America’s youth should be of concern to all. The focus should be on decreasing sexual activity in this age group, not enabling it. Students should not be exposed to material teaching them about having sexual relations, as is the case with the influx of pornographic materials in the library and even in class. It is hard to fathom that giving out free condoms like candy to 12-year-olds will not increase sexual activity or curiosity about sex. The claim that access to condoms delays sexual activity seems preposterous.

Not only is the sexualization of children an issue, but so are parental rights. Students should not be able to access contraceptives without parental knowledge or consent. The schools are once again placing themselves between parents and their children. This is a recurring theme that is only increasing, and parents must step up in order to stop the commandeering of their children by the state.